SouthEast Vocational Experts

provides vocational consulting services to the community, schools, Government, and also in the form of litigation support, vocational assessments, and testimony in court. Vocational assessments include psychometric testing, loss of earning capacity calculations, labor market surveys, and transferable skills analysis, as well as specific job analysis in order to determine essential functions of an occupation.

Current areas of practice include IDEA Transitional Evaluations, IEP review, WOIA Transitional Evaluations, Return to Worker Services, Personal Injury PI, workers’ compensation, long term disability LTD, medical malpractice, product liability, ADA discrimination, and marital dissolution.

We also provide Veterans Disability Services in Disability Evaluations and Total Disability Individual Unemployability Evaluations.

http://sevocationalexperts.com/

http://transitional-evaluation.com/

http://veteransdisability-vocationalexpert.us/

 

Tennessee Vocational Expert Disability Evaluation

– Divorce, Veteran, LTD, SSA/SSI –

SouthEast Vocational Experts: Leaders in Forensic Mental Health & Vocational Evaluations.

Disability Evaluation process and procedures differ depending on the Venue as well as the issued involved in the case.

this will cover the major aspects – each case is different and therefore will have different needs, we do not have a one size fits all assessment process.

Disability Evaluation – Forensic VOCATIONAL EVALUATION  PROCESS

1) Document Review – General list:

Hospital, Physician, Psychiatrist, Psychologist, & Counselor records, Disability Forms.

2)  We Use Both a Structured and Unstructured Diagnostic  Vocational Interview

This will be a review of the Veteran’s history and will also outline the Veteran’s age, education, current work status, past work experience, skills, current medical & psychological impairment(s), treatments, and physical & psychological limitations.

(This can be in-person or through SKYPE)

3)  Assessment of Current Information and determining if more documentation is needed.

– If needed we will create Medical and/or Psychological Source forms and/or Mental Residual Functional Capacity (MRFC), Physical Residual Functional Capacity (RFC).  This will be the disabled individual or their Representative responsibility to get completed and returned to us.

4)  Vocational & Forensic Mental Health Evaluation (Psychometric Assessments) (most cases will require one or more tests)

Based on the case we will determine what assessments need to be completed. We will assess not only aptitudes but also may measure Attention, Concentration (ADHD), Memory, Cognitive Abilities, IQ, Mental Health / Psychiatric Measures (Depression, Bi-Polar, Acute Anxiety,  GAD, PTSD, Schizophrenia, etc.)

5)  Perform a Vocational Diagnostic Assessment of Residual Employability.

this includes a Transferable Skills Analysis

6)   Labor Market Research (if needed)

Private, local, state, and federal government labor market studies to determine if any significant number of jobs exist that the claimant can perform in the local and national labor market.

The results of the vocational evaluation enable the Vocational Expert to render an opinion as to the employability of the permanently injured veteran’s and their ability to perform substantial gainful work activity based on quantifiable, accurate, and current information using Veteran’s Disability standards.

Georgia – psycho-educational transitional evaluations

detailed statement of fees will be provided for clients’ submission to insurance companies for self-filing claims. Please note that most insurance companies do not cover psycho-educational testing for developmental delays or learning issues, as they deem these services ‘educational’ rather than ‘medical’, even if the provider is ‘in-network’.

Schools will pay for Transitional Evaluations however, many parents often have to hire an attorney or school advocate in order for this to occur.

We provide services for school aged children as well as college students with learning disabilities, attention problems, and behavioral concerns.

We provide the following psych0-educational evaluation services:

Comprehensive psycho-educational evaluations that define children’s learning profile, academic strengths and weaknesses, and recommendations for effective remediation and accommodations. The evaluations assess the following areas:

Complete psycho-educational transitional evaluation – $1950

  • comprehensive intelligence testing/Cognitive Processes (e.g., processing speed, flexibility)
  • comprehensive memory testing
  • comprehensive achievement testing in all academic areas
  • computerized attention assessment
  • behavior/emotional/social assessment
  • comprehensive testing of all neuropsychological processing areas appropriate, such as processing speed, visual-motor skills, visual-perceptual skills, auditory processing skills, phonological processing skills, attention/concentration skills
  • Interest Testing
  • Manual Dexterity
  • Vocational and Work Samples
  • comprehensive transitional evaluation  report

Emotional/Behavioral Assessment

  • Call and speak to us regarding your concerns in order to obtain an estimated cost of assessment.  These are typically completed on an hourly fee basis.

Academic Assessment only

  • Achievement testing in all academic areas (basic reading, reading comprehension, math reasoning, math calculation, written expression) with a brief written report – $500

Consultation

  • Our clinicians are available to meet with you to discuss behavioral, learning, and developmental issues.  We are happy to attend meetings at your child’s school or complete observations in alternate locations.

Forensic Vocational Expert

Pre Pre Employment Test

Will Help you Hire the Right Person for your Team:

As Vocational Expert Professionals, we deal with many different kinds of people issues on a daily basis.  SouthEast Vocational Experts uses pre employment screening to help you hire the right person(s), the first time, so you are no longer stuck asking yourself “when are we going to get good people?” or “they looked so good on paper and sounded good in the interview, what did we miss?”

PRE EMPLOYMENT SCREENING  DOESN’T JUST SAVES TIME AND MONEY, IT INCREASES PROFITABILITY!

Every time an employee resigns you waste countless hours searching for a replacement. Employee turnover costs you serious training dollars, not to mention the cost of BAD HIRES. Pre employment screening will save you time and money so that your human resources department is not bogged down with personnel issues that could have been avoided.

PRE EMPLOYMENT TESTING HELPS YOU REDUCE COMMUNICATION & CONFLICT ISSUES

Pre employment testing will help you reduce the time you spend dealing with people issues. You can’t afford to spend half your day dealing with personnel issues. If you find that the people in your Human Resources Department are wasting their time solving personality conflicts or trying to “fix” your current employees then the success of your business is really at stake. Pre employment screening will help you choose employees that will make positive contributions to your business.

BASIC PRE EMPLOYMENT SCREENING TEST AREAS:

  • LAB Profile
  • Personality & Behavioral Assessments – See how well a candidate will fit the job before extending a hire offer
  • Skills Testing — Gauge a candidate’s true skill levels in a variety of applications
  • Background Checks — Keep your workplace safe, you can be sued if you hire a person with violent passed
  • Drug Screening — Ensure you promote a drug-free work environment

A Pre Employment Screening  Will Help You Improve Productivity and Profitability!

Using a pre employment screening test(s) will help you improve your company’s productivity and allow you to make your team more effective. Hiring the right sales people will mean that sales targets won’t be missed. When you hire the right people you can rest assured they won’t miss productivity targets.

Pre Employment  Screening Tests Will Help You Find Leaders

Employment tests will help you identify candidates that are natural born leaders so that they can use their leadership qualities to help improve your business. It’s a real problem when managers have to spend so much time dealing with people issues. We will provide you with information on employment screening so that you can:

  • Ensure your current managers are more effective
  • Avoid manager and employee personality conflicts
  • Identify the best potential leaders and then invest in their development.

Pre Employment Screening is Easy

We have helped companies to:

  • Hire to the right job fit every time to reduce turnover.
  • Hire an Individual with that right BEHAVIORAL Traits for the position
  • Learn how to Motivate current employees based on their Behavioral & Language Filters
  • Coach current employees to be more productive.

Strategic Workforce Planning through Pre Employment Screening

Pre Employment Screening or just getting a LAB Profile on current employees  will help you to build a high performance organization through the use of employee assessments and give you the ability to:

  • Hire the right people every time.
  • Reduce turnover costs and wasted training dollars every year.
  • Re-organize your company for bigger profits today.
  • Build high performance teams that produce maximum results.
  • Keep your top leadership people and make them highly effective.
  • Know where your bench strength is and identify the best leadership potential within.
  • Never hire a bottom performer again.
  • Maximize the potential of your current employees to improve profitability now.

Alabama Vocational Expert

– Divorce, Veteran, LTD, SSA/SSI –

SouthEast Vocational Experts: Leaders in Forensic Mental Health & Vocational Evaluations in Alabama.

Disability Evaluation process and procedures differ depending on the Venue as well as the issued involved in the case.

this will cover the major aspects – each case is different and therefore will have different needs, we do not have a one size fits all assessment process.

Disability Evaluation – Forensic VOCATIONAL EVALUATION  PROCESS

1) Document Review – General list:

Hospital, Physician, Psychiatrist, Psychologist, & Counselor records, Disability Forms.

2)  We Use Both a Structured and Unstructured Diagnostic  Vocational Interview

This will be a review of the Veteran’s history and will also outline the Veteran’s age, education, current work status, past work experience, skills, current medical & psychological impairment(s), treatments, and physical & psychological limitations.

(This can be in-person or through SKYPE)

3)  Assessment of Current Information and determining if more documentation is needed.

– If needed we will create Medical and/or Psychological Source forms and/or Mental Residual Functional Capacity (MRFC), Physical Residual Functional Capacity (RFC).  This will be the disabled individual or their Representative responsibility to get completed and returned to us.

4)  Vocational & Forensic Mental Health Evaluation (Psychometric Assessments) (most cases will require one or more tests)

Based on the case we will determine what assessments need to be completed. We will assess not only aptitudes but also may measure Attention, Concentration (ADHD), Memory, Cognitive Abilities, IQ, Mental Health / Psychiatric Measures (Depression, Bi-Polar, Acute Anxiety,  GAD, PTSD, Schizophrenia, etc.)

5)  Perform a Vocational Diagnostic Assessment of Residual Employability.

this includes a Transferable Skills Analysis

6)   Labor Market Research (if needed)

Private, local, state, and federal government labor market studies to determine if any significant number of jobs exist that the claimant can perform in the local and national labor market.

The results of the vocational evaluation enable the Vocational Expert to render an opinion as to the employability of the permanently injured veteran’s and their ability to perform substantial gainful work activity based on quantifiable, accurate, and current information using Veteran’s Disability standards. We provide services nationally as well as in Alabama and the South East.

Quick FACTS – Military Sexual Trauma – MST – PTSD

MILITARY SEXUAL TRAUMA
Disabilities determined by VA to be related to your military service can lead to monthly non-taxable compensation, enrollment in the
VA health care system, a 10-point hiring preference for federal employment and other important benefits. Ask your VA
representative or Veterans Service Organization representative about Disability Compensation, Pension, Health Care, Caregiver
Program, Career Services, Educational Assistance, Home Loan Guaranty, Insurance and/or Dependents and Survivors’ Benefits.
DISABILITY COMPENSATION FOR CONDITIONS RELATED TO
MILITARY SEXUAL TRAUMA (MST)
Disabilities determined by VA to be related to your military service can lead to monthly non-taxable compensation, enrollment in the VA health care system, a 10-point hiring preference for federal employment, and other important benefits. Ask your VA representative or Veterans Service
Organization representative about Disability Compensation, Pension, Health Care, Caregiver Program, Career Services, Educational Assistance, Home Loan Guaranty, Insurance and/or Dependents and Survivors Benefits. Some Veterans may have experienced sexual trauma while serving in the military. These kinds of experiences can affect Veterans’ mental and physical health, even many years later. Veterans can
apply for disability compensation for any current difficulties that are related to their service, including difficulties related to MST.

HOW DOES VA DEFINE MST?
MST is defined by Title 38 U.S. Code 1720D
as “psychological trauma resulting from a physical assault of a sexual nature, battery of a sexual nature, or sexual harassment which occurred while the Veteran was serving on active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty training.” Sexual harassment is defined as “repeated, unsolicited verbal or physical contact of a sexual nature which is threatening in character.”

ARE VETERANS GRANTED DISABILITY COMPENSATION FOR MST?
Veterans are not granted compensation for the traumatic event itself, but can be granted disability compensation for conditions that result from MST.  Compensation – April 2015
CAN YOU DEVELOP POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DIS ORDER (PTSD) OR OTHE R MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS AS A RESULT OF MST?
Yes. Exposure to any trauma can potentially result in PTSD or another mental health disorder. PTSD is the most common mental health diagnosis related to experiencing MST.
WHAT EVIDENCE CAN SU PPORT A DISABILITY C LAIM FOR PTSD AS A R ESULT OF MST?
Department of Defense forms used in reporting incidents of sexual assault or harassment, as well as investigative reports during military service are direct evidence to support these claims. However, VA knows that events involving sexual trauma are not always officially reported. Therefore, for PTSD claims related to MST VA has relaxed the evidentiary requirements and looks for “markers” (i.e., signs, events, or circumstances) that provide some indication that the traumatic event happened.
These include, but are not limited to:  Records from law enforcement authorities, rape crisis centers, mental health counseling centers, hospitals, or physicians Pregnancy tests or tests for sexually transmitted diseases Statements from family members, roommates, fellow Servicemembers, clergy members, or counselors Requests for transfer to another military duty assignment. Deterioration in work performance Substance abuse. Episodes of depression, panic attacks, or anxiety without an identifiable cause.  Unexplained economic or social behavioral changes Relationship issues, such as divorce Sexual dysfunction
VA RELAXED THE STAND ARDS OF EVIDENCE FOR COMBAT RELATED PTSD. ARE T HE STANDARDS OF EVIDENC E FOR MST – RELATED PTSD CLAIMS MORE STRINGENT THAN OTHER PTSD CLAIMS?
No. In fact, VA relaxed its evidentiary standard for disability claims related to MST in 2002 to ensure all available evidence supporting these claims is considered. Because military service records may lack corroborating evidence that a stressful event occurred, VA regulations make clear that evidence from non-military sources may be used to corroborate the Veteran’s account of the MST. Further, when direct evidence of an MST is not available, VA may request a medical opinion to consider a Veteran’s account and any “markers” to corroborate the occurrence of the MST event as related to current PTSD symptoms.

CAN PREVIOUSLY DENIE D MST RELATED P TSD DISABILITY CLAIM S BE RE – EVALUATED?
Yes. Increased awareness of MST issues resulted in special training beginning in December 2011 for all VA regional office personnel who process MST-related claims and the mental health clinicians conducting the examinations related to these claims. This ongoing training focuses on discovering “marker” evidence to support the claim. VA wants all Veterans who filed MST-related PTSD claims before December 2011 to receive the benefits of this nationwide training. If your claim was submitted before that date and denied, you can request a re-evaluation from your local VA regional office.
WHAT DO VETERANS NEE D TO DO TO GET A PRE VIOUSLY DENIED MST- RELATED PTSD DISABILITY CLAIM RE – EVALUATED?
Veterans who want VA to review their previously denied MST-related PTSD claim can start by contacting their regional office, calling 1-800-827-1000 or logging into their free eBenefits account at www.eBenefits.va.gov.
CAN VETERANS PROVIDE NEW INFORMATION FOR A RE-EVALUATION OF A PREVIOUSLY DENIED MSTRELATED PTSD DISABILITY CLAIM?
Yes. VBA will accept new evidence to be reviewed when a claim is re-evaluated. It’s best to send any new evidence at the same time as you request a re-evaluation. Veterans Service Organizations, as well as MST specialists and/or Women Veterans Coordinators available at every VA regional office, can help you determine what type of information is best to submit.
DO I NEED TO BE SERVICE CONNECTED FOR MY CONDITIONS RELATED TO MST TO GET TREATMENT?
No. VA provides free health care for physical and mental health conditions related to experiences of MST. No documentation of the MST experiences or disability compensation rating is required. Some Veterans may be able to receive this free MST-related health care even if they are not eligible for other VA care.
HOW CAN YOU APPLY FOR DISABILITY COMPENSATION?
You can apply for disability compensation by completing VA Form 21-526, Veteran’s Application for Compensation and/or Pension. You may also apply online at www.ebenefits.va.gov, or you can appoint an accredited Veterans Service Officer (VSO) to assist you. Male and female MST coordinators are available at every VA regional office to assist Veterans filing claims related to personal assault or MST. You can call 1-800-827-1000, and VA will put you in touch with an MST coordinator, or you can email the MST coordinator at your local regional office from the list of Compensation – April 2015 coordinators located at http://www.benefits.va.gov/benefits/mstcoordinators.asp . For informationabout MST-related treatment, visit ww.mentalhealth.va.gov/msthome.asp.

Overview

Female deep in thought.

Military sexual trauma (MST) is the term that the Department of Veterans Affairs uses to refer to sexual assault or repeated, threatening sexual harassment that occurred while the Veteran was in the military. It includes any sexual activity in which one is involved against one’s will – he or she may have been pressured into sexual activities (for example, with threats of negative consequences for refusing to be sexually cooperative or with implied faster promotions or better treatment in exchange for sex), may have been unable to consent to sexual activities (for example, when intoxicated), or may have been physically forced into sexual activities. Other experiences that fall into the category of MST include unwanted sexual touching or grabbing; threatening, offensive remarks about a person’s body or sexual activities; and/or threatening or unwelcome sexual advances.

Male deep in thought.Both women and men can experience MST during their service. All Veterans seen at Veterans Health Administration facilities are asked about experiences of sexual trauma because we know that any type of trauma can affect a person’s physical and mental health, even many years later. We also know that people can recover from trauma. VA has free services to help Veterans do this. You do not need to have a VA disability rating (i.e., “service connected”) to receive these services and may be able to receive services even if you are not eligible for other VA care. You do not need to have reported the incident(s) when they happened or have other documentation that they occurred.

This website has information about the health care services that VA has available for Veterans who experienced MST.  For information about VA disability compensation for conditions related to MST, please view this fact sheet about Disability Compensation for Personal Assault or Military Sexual Trauma.

Psychiatric Disability

 

In our experience, mental health disabilities tend to be some the most disabling conditions an individual can suffer from, which often prevent them from even being able to do sedentary work.

Mental disabilities including depression, Anxiety, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are complex cases that can be further complicated because they often co-exist with PTSD or TBI.Veteran Suffering Mental Illness Psychiatric Disability

Many Veterans suffer from Psychiatric/Mental Health issues. If they are service connected you may wish to have them Objectively Assessed by a Vocational Expert for your Veterans Disability or TDIU Claim.

In general, in order to get VA benefits for a psychiatric disabilities such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, you need to establish the main elements of service-connection between your psychiatric disability and your time in the military.

First, you need to get a current OBJECTIV diagnosis of a mental disability. You must be diagnosed with a mental illness other than a personality disorder. The VA will not grant disability benefits for a personality disorder because they are considered to be a condition you are born with and thus not caused by your time in the military. Second, you need evidence of an in-service occurrence or aggravation of a disease, injury or precipitating event. Third, you must establish a link between the in-service event and the current mental disability.

A mental disability does not have to be your primary disability type in order to get VA benefits. For instance, if you are service-connected for a knee condition and a low back condition that produces such severe chronic pain as to cause depression, then you can get service-connection for the depression secondary

Many Doctors and Psychologist will give you a mental health diagnosis in their notes but do no OBJECTIVE tests or Measures, and therefore your left with Subjective information that the VA and Judge can give little to no weight too.

YOU NEED OBJECTIVE Evidence and we at SouthEast Vocational Experts provide Objective Testing and Assessments.

Forensic Mental Health Evaluation Methods

Forensic Evaluation Methods
 

The following sections summarize the basic steps and principles involved in conducting forensic mental health evaluations.  Guidelines for specific types of evaluations are found in the relevant topic areas.  K. Heilbrun’s Forensic Mental Health Assessment (2002) and K. Heilbrun, G. Marczk, & D. DeMatteo’s Forensic Mental Health Assessment: A Casebook (2002) provide a description of principles for conducting forensic evaluations.

I.   Define the Referral Questions
Mental health clinicians clarify the referral questions with the attorney prior to accepting the case.  In order to do so effectively, clinicians should be informed of the relevant statutes, case law, and other criteria considered by the legal decision makers. In addition, consideration should be given to social science research as it pertains to the legal questions of a given case.
II. Determine the Scope of the Evaluation
Mental health clinicians should determine which legal criteria are relevant for consideration in a forensic mental health assessment.  That is, before determining how a construct can be assessed, the clinician must determine the appropriateness of the construct.
Certain legal criteria are issues of fact (e.g., age, prior record) while others are “questions beyond the scope of clinical forensic expertise” (e.g., the impact of the offense on the community).  Although neither of these areas are formally “assessed,” they are not ignored and are “important for the assessment of legally relevant capacities and behavior that are addressed by the evaluation” (Heilbrun, Marczk, & DeMatteo, 2002).
III.  Translate Legal Criteria to Psychological Constructs
Mental health clinicians translate legal criteria to psychological constructs and develop a plan of action for assessing those constructs.
Legal criteria and psychological constructs can be difficult to define and operationalize.  Mental health clinicians first determine the meaning(s) and intent of legal terminology and criteria based on case law and other legal sources and analyses.  On a more practical level, mental health clinicians discuss with the referral source (judge, attorney) about the purpose(s) of the evaluation and potential uses of the evaluation results.  Based on this information, mental health clinicians determine what psychological constructs are relevant and applicable to the case.  In assessing these constructs, mental health clinicians rely on empirically validated assessment tools and methods that will be admissible in court.
IV.   Use of Psychological Tests and Methods
Mental health clinicians utilize valid, reliable, and generally accepted methods of accessing constructs.  Whenever possible, the mental health clinician uses multiple methods for assessing and describing constructs.   Although it may be tempting for mental health clinicians (and judges and attorneys) to rely solely on the results of a certain test, care must be taken to remember that a more comprehensive evaluation requires consideration of a multitude of factors measured or assesses through multiple measures and methods.
A.    Measures of Intelligence, Adaptive Functioning, and Academic Achievement:   The most widely used intelligence tests are the Wechsler Intelligence Scales (e.g., WAIS, WISC-IV).  These scales provide information about a person’s functioning in four areas: verbal ability; nonverbal reasoning and spatial abilities; processing speed; and working memory.
Adaptive Functioning:  Adaptive behavior can be measured with a number of tools (e.g., Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales), which are used to determine if a person meets criteria for Mental Retardation.  Information about a defendant’s adaptive functioning is also relevant to a determination of treatment needs.
Academic Functioning:  There are a number of different ways to measure academic achievement, ranging from very brief screening tools to rather extensive assessments (e.g., Woodcock Johnson).  The Wide Range Achievement Tests provide a relatively brief but thorough assessment of achievement in Spelling, Reading, and Mathematics.  Practically, a measure of reading ability ensures that the defendant has the requisite skills to complete other tests (e.g., PAI, which has a 4th grade reading level).  In terms of the evaluation, a measure of academic achievement allows for the diagnosis or ruling-out of learning disabilities, which will guide decisions about treatment needs.
B.     Personality Testing and Measures of Psychopathology, Behavioral Disturbance, and Substance Abuse:  There are hundreds of different personality tests (see See T, Grisso, G. Vincent, & D. Seagrave’s Mental Health Screening and Assessment in Juvenile Justice (2005) for a more complete review of instruments used in the juvenile justice system).  The most widely used comprehensive assessment instruments include the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2 and MMPI-A); the Personality Assessment Instrument (PAI and PAI-A); the Diagnostic Interview Schedules; and the Millon Clinical Inventories.  These instruments assess a number of psychological constructs and personality traits.  Some have scales describing the person’s response style, which can be helpful in establishing the person’s attitude and motivation during the evaluation.
Other instruments are also available to assess specific areas, such as a particular disorder or problem area (e.g., substance abuse, anger, aggression).  These instruments are good supplements to the more comprehensive instruments described above but may not always include an index of a person’s response style.  In addition, these scales will vary in their utility and psychometric properties, and mental health clinicians should be able to demonstrate that the scales meet the standards for admissibility in court.
C.     Measures of Effort or Malingering:  Some general personality measures (e.g., MMPI, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory, PAI) have scales of embedded in them to assess response style and profile validity.  In addition, there are some basic interview techniques and means of assessing test-taking effort available to clinicians assessing adults and adolescents.
Mental health clinicians should be aware of the possibility that those involved in the legal system may exaggerate or fabricate symptoms.  As a matter of routine, some measure or other assessment of effort should be conducted in every case.  This will (hopefully) increase the validity of the findings and opinions, as well as preempt challenges during cross-examination.
D.     Forensic Assessment Instruments:
V.     Communicate with the Referral Source
Mental health clinicians maintain communication with the referral source and makes changes to the evaluation objectives and process as necessary.
Additional evaluation questions:  Over the course of the evaluation, mental health clinicians may become aware of or suspect that a defendant lacks certain legal capacities (e.g., to stand trial, to waive Miranda rights).  With ongoing communication with the attorney, clinicians can recommend or question the attorney about the relevance of these issues in the preparation of the case.
Unhelpful Information is uncovered:  Sometimes defendants will provide conflicting or “harmful” information about the case.  It is also possible that as the evaluation progresses the evaluator begins to form an opinion that would not be helpful in the case.  Therefore, mental health professionals inform the attorneys of all information that is gathered, as well as how that information influences the forensic opinion throughout the evaluation process.
Conflicts of Interest:  When mental health clinicians become aware that there is an actual or potential conflict of interest – or when a clinician’s objectivity is otherwise compromised –  then the clinician must inform the attorney of those conflicts.
VI.             Applying Psychological Research
Mental health clinicians maintain up-to-date knowledge of research relevant to the forensic issues of a case and are able to apply that research appropriately.
VII.       Communicating the Results
             Mental health clinicians effectively communicates results with legal professionals
         and decision makers.
          Methods of Communicating Results:
No Report or Testimony:  Following the evaluation and prior to the hearing and preparation of any report, the mental health clinician and attorney should discuss the benefits and risks of using the expert; preparing a letter/report; and/or testifying in court.
Letters/Reports:  Letters are usually brief, approximately 2-4 pages in length; highlight important aspects of the juvenile’s history; and it concludes with information relevant to the legal criteria described in the general statutes.  Reports are lengthier and provide a more detailed account of the juvenile’s history; evaluation process; and description of diagnoses (if any), opinions and recommendations.
Testimony:  If testimony is required, it may be helpful for the mental health clinician and/or attorney to develop a list of possible questions, including potential cross-examination questions.
Regardless of format, make sure that all the components of the statutes are covered – as well as any other pertinent factors in the case – before submitting the report or calling the expert to testify.
In addition:
·         The report/testimony should respond directly to the referral question and legal criteria;
·         Communications should avoid jargon;
·         The evaluator should not respond directly to the ultimate legal question directly;
·         The evaluator should provide a full description of findings so that they need change little under cross-examination (Heilbrun, Marczk, & DeMatteo, 2002)
References and Recommended Sources
T. Grisso, G. Vincent, & D. Seagrave.  Mental Health Screening and Assessment in Juvenile Justice.  The Guilford Press (2005).
K. Heilbrun.  Forensic Mental Health Assessment.  Oxford University Press (2002).
K. Heilbrun, G. Marczk, & D. DeMatteo.  Forensic Mental Health Assessment: A Casebook.  Oxford University Press (2002).
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Olmstead Self-Assessment

Assess How Olmstead May Assist You to Live in the Community

Click on the link below to do this self-assessment to determine the potential right you or a person with a disability in your family might have to get the assistance needed to live at home rather than in a nursing facility or institution.  Such assistance may include home health services, nursing assistance, or other assistance with activities of daily living.

This self-assessment is based on the U.S. Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision.  Olmstead requires states, with some limitations, to assist people with disabilities to live at home if they would otherwise receive services funded by the state in a nursing home or institution.  It is based on the Americans with Disabilities Act.  Olmstead applies to individuals with developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, physical disabilities, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and other disabilities if a person meets the eligibility for nursing facility or other institution.

This self-assessment will ask questions about your disability and current situation.  It will provide links to agencies that may be able to assist you, including organizations that may be able to provide legal advocacy.  Finally, it will assist you in writing a complaint to the United States Justice Department or the Office of Civil Rights at the United States Department of Health Human Services if you believe your rights are being violated based on Olmstead and the ADA.

 

We hope you find our self-help assessment tool to be useful.

Florida Vocational Expert Disability Evaluation

– Divorce, Veteran, Disability,  LTD, SSA/SSI –

SouthEast Vocational Experts: Leaders in Forensic Mental Health & Vocational Evaluations.

Disability Evaluation process and procedures differ depending on the Venue as well as the issued involved in the case. We specialize in Psychological Disability Evaluations.

this will cover the major aspects – each case is different and therefore will have different needs, we do not have a one size fits all assessment process.

Disability Evaluation – Forensic VOCATIONAL EVALUATION  PROCESS

1) Document Review – General list:

Hospital, Physician, Psychiatrist, Psychologist, & Counselor records, Disability Forms.

2)  We Use Both a Structured and Unstructured Diagnostic  Vocational Interview

This will be a review of the Veteran’s history and will also outline the Veteran’s age, education, current work status, past work experience, skills, current medical & psychological impairment(s), treatments, and physical & psychological limitations.

(This can be in-person or through SKYPE)

3)  Assessment of Current Information and determining if more documentation is needed.

– If needed we will create Medical and/or Psychological Source forms and/or Mental Residual Functional Capacity (MRFC), Physical Residual Functional Capacity (RFC).  This will be the disabled individual or their Representative responsibility to get completed and returned to us.

4)  Vocational & Forensic Mental Health Evaluation (Psychometric Assessments) (most cases will require one or more tests)

Based on the case we will determine what assessments need to be completed. We will assess not only aptitudes but also may measure Attention, Concentration (ADHD), Memory, Cognitive Abilities, IQ, Mental Health / Psychiatric Measures (Depression, Bi-Polar, Acute Anxiety,  GAD, PTSD, Schizophrenia, etc.)

5)  Perform a Vocational Diagnostic Assessment of Residual Employability.

this includes a Transferable Skills Analysis

6)   Labor Market Research (if needed)

Private, local, state, and federal government labor market studies to determine if any significant number of jobs exist that the claimant can perform in the local and national labor market.

The results of the vocational evaluation enable the Vocational Expert to render an opinion as to the employability of the permanently injured veteran’s and their ability to perform substantial gainful work activity based on quantifiable, accurate, and current information using Veteran’s Disability standards.

 

Florida Vocational Expert